The Story

 

Things I Never Said  follows the lives of four Asian Americans and their mental health journeys.

Not only are we exploring the reasons why people choose to stay in isolation, but also how familial cultural differences and the model minority myth fuel social and academic pressures put on Asian Americans.

This story is also guided by a community art installation as a therapeutic release for the subjects and the local Los Angeles community to collectively share our mental health struggles.

2.2MAsian Americans live with a diagnosable mental illness1

ONLY 3.4%visit a mental health specialist2

Leaving 2,125,200 Asian Americans

undiagnosed and untreated

The People

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KAREL

Military veteran. Currently a college student.

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Pattie

Physical therapist and singer-songwriter. 

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Nolan

Realtor and a senior substance use disorder counselor.

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Ravina 

Mental health therapist.

"I thought my depression and anxiety were just hands that life dealt me. It's not until I opened up about my struggles that I realized I was not alone in this fight"

- Wendy Wang

Director of  Things I Never Said

The Narrative

Personal Stories

 

Four young Asian Americans and their mental health journeys

Brainstorming

Professionals

Mental health and research professionals

Friends & Family

 

The friends and family members of the four individuals

Art installation 

A local art installation making mental health a visual and visceral experience for all

Why Is This Important?

These stories focus on amplifying Asian American voices and the community; however, mental health is something that we all struggle with, no matter what your ethnicity is.

To make this documentary we need your financial support to: 

EMPOWER

Those struggling to feel safe to have conversations about mental health with their friends and family. 

INSPIRE 

Individuals to take small steps toward healing.

SUPPORT

Younger generations to seek help and to speak up.

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1. “Asian American/Pacific Islander Communities and Mental Health.” Mental Health America, 30 June 2016, www.mentalhealthamerica.net/issues/asian-americanpacific-islander-communities-and-mental-health.

2. Jang, Yuri. Final Report of the Asian American Quality of Life (AAQoL). Asian American Quality of Life, 2016, www.austintexas.gov/sites/default/files/files/Communications/4.2_FINAL_AA_in_Austin_report_from_UT.pdf.